Navigate the Configuration Hierarchy in Juniper Junos (up, top, exit configuration-mode)

After we now know about the Configuration hierarchy, I would like to show you how you can navigate it. What does it mean exactly? Well, think that you are on the user configuration hierarchy level and you want to go back to the top level or maybe to a level in between, would this be possible? The answer is yes indeed it is possible. Let me show you how this can be done.

Let’s do to the system configuration hierarchy level:

root@R1# edit system

[edit system]

root@R1#

I am now on the “edit system” configuration hierarchy level as you can see.

From this level, I can write any command which comes under the “system” command as follows:

[edit system]

root@R1# set ?

Possible completions:

> accounting                 System accounting configuration

allow-6pe-traceroute  Allow IPv4-mapped v6 address in tag icmp6 TTL expired packet

allow-v4mapped-packets  Allow processing for packets with V4 mapped address

+ apply-groups               Groups from which to inherit configuration data

+ apply-groups-except   Don’t inherit configuration data from these groups

> archival                       System archival management

> arp                               ARP settings

+ authentication-order   Order in which authentication methods are invoked

> auto-configuration

> autoinstallation

> backup-router             IPv4 router to use while booting

> commit                      Configuration commit management

compress-configuration-files  Compress the router configuration files

> configuration-database  Configuration database parameters

> ddos-protection      Configure DDOS process

default-address-selection  Use system address for locally originated traffic

> diag-port-authentication  Authentication for the diagnostic port

domain-name          Domain name for this router

+ domain-search        List of domain names to search

donot-disable-ip6op-ondad  Do not disable IP operation on interface, if DAD fails on EUI-64 link local address

—(more 32%)—

From there, I will go to the user Brian configuration hierarchy level that I have created in the previous lesson:

root@R1# edit login user ?

Possible completions:

<user-name>          User name (login)

Brian                User name (login)

Jack                 User name (login)

Maher                User name (login)

[edit system]

root@R1# edit login user Brian

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1#

You see that I am on the user Brian configuration hierarchy level now. Let’s say I have decided to go back to the top configuration hierarchy level. Let me show you how I can do that:

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1# top

[edit]

root@R1#

Using the command “top”, I can go to the “edit” configuration hierarchy level from any level that I am in.

Let’s go back to the user Brian level:

root@R1# edit system login user Brian

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1#

Say now that you want to go just 1 level back and not to the top. To do that, you can use the command “up” and it will move you one level back only.

Let’s try it:

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1# up

[edit system login]

root@R1#

You can see, once I wrote the command “up”, I went just one level up to the “login” configuration hierarchy level.

It is possible that you write the command “up” and give a number after it. That means that in case you write for example “up 2”, then you will go back 2 configuration hierarchy level. If you just write “up” then it will assume that it is “up 1” and will go only one level back.

I will go to Brian user again and will try “up 2” to see what I will get:

[edit system login]

root@R1# edit user Brian

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1# up 2

[edit system]

root@R1#

Indeed, the configuration hierarchy level has moved 2 level back to the “system” level. Excellent!

The last thing that I want to show you in this lesson is that in case you are in any configuration hierarchy level and you decided that you want to go to the operational mode. Normally you should for example write “top” then “exit” and you are on the operational mode. However, there is a possibility that you use just one command and you go to the operational mode. Let me show you how this can be done:

[edit system]

root@R1# edit login user Brian

[edit system login user Brian]

root@R1# exit configuration-mode

Exiting configuration mode

root@R1>

I went to the user Brian level then I wrote the command “exist configuration-mode”. Once done, you can see that I went directly to the operational mode. This is the way you can do it using just one command to go to the operational mode.

This is all what I wanted to show you in lesson, I hope you have enjoyed it and see you in the upcoming one 😊

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